FAQ

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

BEFORE YOU DEPART

Travel Insurance

A watertight travel insurance policy covering theft, loss and medical problems is recommended. While theft isn’t a huge problem, rental cars are sometimes targeted by opportunists and Montenegro’s roads aren’t the world’s safest. There are plenty of policies to choose from – compare the fine print and shop around.

 

If you’re an EU citizen, you will be covered for most emergency medical care except for emergency repatriation home. Citizens from other countries should find out if there is a reciprocal arrangement for free medical care between their country and Montenegro. Strongly consider a policy that covers you for the worst possible scenario, such as an accident requiring an emergency flight home. Find out in advance if your insurance plan will make payments directly to providers or if it will reimburse you later for any overseas health expenditures. The former option is generally preferable, especially if your finances are limited.

 

Some policies specifically exclude designated ‘dangerous activities’ such as scuba-diving, parasailing, paragliding, canyoning, white-water rafting, skiing and even hiking. If you plan on doing any of these things (a distinct possibility in Montenegro), make sure the policy you choose covers you fully and includes ambulances and emergency medical evacuation.

 

If you need to make a claim, ensure you obtain and keep all relevant documentation. This may involve a police report in case of theft and invoices for medical expenses incurred. Some policies ask you to call back (reverse charges) to a centre in your home country where an immediate assessment of your problem is made.

Visa Information

Visa policy of Montenegro

Visa policy of Montenegro is similar to the Visa policy of the Schengen Area. It grants 90-day visa-free entry to all Schengen Annex II nationalities, except for Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Tuvalu. It also grants visa-free entry to several additional countries such as Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cuba, Ecuador, Kosovo, Kuwait, Qatar, Russia, Turkey and Ukraine.

 

Ordinary passports

Citizens and holders of ordinary passports of the following 96 countries and territories can enter Montenegro without a visa up to 90 days (unless otherwise noted):

 

All European Union citizens

Albania

Andorra

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Australia

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Barbados

Belarus (30 days)

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Brazil

Brunei

Canada

Chile

Colombia

Costa Rica

Cuba (30 days)

Dominica

Ecuador (30 days)

El Salvador

Grenada

Guatemala

Hong Kong

Honduras

Iceland

Israel

Japan

Kosovo (30 days)

Kuwait

Liechtenstein

Macau

Macedonia

Malaysia

Mauritius

Mexico

Moldova

Monaco

Norway

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Panama

Paraguay

Peru (30 days)

Qatar

Russia (30 days)

Samoa

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

San Marino

Serbia

Seychelles

Singapore

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

South Korea

Switzerland

Taiwan

Timor-Leste

Trinidad and Tobago

Turkey

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United States

Uruguay

Vanuatu

Vatican City

Venezuela

 

Foreign visa holders

Nationals of any country may visit Montenegro without a visa for up to 30 days if they hold a visa issued by Ireland, a Schengen Area member state, the United Kingdom or the United States or if they are permanent residents of those countries. Residents of the United Arab Emirates do not require a visa for up to 10 days, if they hold a tourist voucher.

Refugees issued with Refugee travel document by Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, United States, or an EU member state can visit Montenegro without a visa for up to 30 days.

Currency information

Montenegro has no currency of its own.

From 1996 the Deutsche Mark was the de facto currency in all private and banking transactions and it was formally adopted as Montenegro’s currency in November 1999. The mark was replaced by the euro in 2002 without any objections from the European Central Bank (ECB).

 

So, the formal currency in Montenegro is, Euro.

What should I bring?


We recommend bringing ;

  • Hat or Umbrella
  • Sun Screen
  • Bottle of Water
  • Comfortable flat-soled walking shoes
  • Sun Glasses

ON YOUR TRIP

Tipping information

Tips are not required (just as in the U.S. and other countries), but to reward good service, leave a cash tip for your guide & driver after the tour or waiter on the same tray containing your bill, and something on the table for the busser.

Entrance Fees

Cathedral Saint Tryphon and Maritime Museum entrance fees are included.

What to Buy

Montenegro is not renowned for its shopping experience but there are a few local products that make good gifts to bring home including a bottle of velvety red Vranac wine. Browse the local open-air markets for fresh produce and great souvenirs unique to Montenegro. 

 

Kotor

In Kotor you are spoilt for choice when it comes to unique boutiques and craft shops and welcoming cafes to rest your weary legs. Most of Kotor’s speciality shops and boutiques are in the Old Town and the clothes are mostly Italian fashion designers. There are also a number of souvenir shops, stores selling books, jewelry and antiques and hair and beauty saloons. Across Kotor harbor is the bazaar, which sells mostly fruits and vegetables. It takes place every morning except Sunday and is filled with colorful local produce. There is also a big department store and a number of supermarkets.

 

Budva

In Budva’s Old Town there are a variety of good boutiques offering a wide range of clothes in different styles and colors. Nearby stores are selling perfume, jewelry and books. The waterfront walkway along the beach or the main promenade is also a popular shopping area. There is also the summer bazaar next to Budva’s promenade where you can find various clothes and beach items. It’s a great place to pick up a Montenegrin souvenir.

 

Shopping tips

The shops are usually open Monday to Friday 9am to 12pm and 1pm to 9pm and 8am to 3pm on Saturdays, although in the touristy areas many shops will stay open as late as midnight in the high season. Grocery stores open as early as 6am. Credit cards are widely accepted but cash may be necessary for some payments. The currency is the Euro.

KOTOR SHUTTLE

  •   Adresa u Montenegro : UI. 22. Novembra, Budva

  •    Tel: +90 533 640 1103

  •    Mail: info@kotorshuttle.com

         

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